Lots of whales and penguins

When the annual Ross Sea ice melts this area comes alive with lots of wildlife, especially at the edge of the ice shelf (which doesn’t melt).  Adelie and Emperor penguins come out and can be seen just about anywhere… even walking right down the center of McMurdo Station!  In addition to the penguins, the melting ice attracts more seals and both Minke and Orca (Killer) whales.  They are all looking for food and since they are mammals, they need air to breathe.  The ice edge has a lot of wildlife activity and Orcas will come to hunt Minkes, seals, and sometimes a penguin.  The Orcas live together in Pods that span many generations.  They are amazing animals and will start communicating with their young when they are still in the mother’s womb.  The scientists that study them say that their communication and ability to transfer knowledge between generations actually rivals humans!  When you watch them hunt in packs and look for seals sitting on ice floes you will believe it.  They are highly intelligent.

The Minke whales are plankton eaters and are also pretty curious.  They will poke their heads out of the water and look at you if you are on the ice edge.  The penguins and seals are sometimes curious too and have been known to just walk, or waddle, up to you.  It seems they all like to sleep a lot!

A Minke whale cruising the ice edge with some sleepy seals in the background.

A Minke whale cruising the ice edge with some sleepy seals in the background.

A pod of Minke whales getting ready to dive under the ice near the pressure ridges.  The pressure ridges are caused by the ice shelf pressing against a land mass and causing the ice to buckle.  There are almost always seals nearby due to the cracks that are formed.

A pod of Minke whales getting ready to dive under the ice near the pressure ridges. The pressure ridges are caused by the ice shelf pressing against a land mass and causing the ice to buckle. There are almost always seals nearby due to the cracks that are formed.

Some sleepy Adelie penguins basking in the sun at Hut Point, McMurdo Station.  They come ashore to escape the seals and whales that might want to eat them.  These ones are just getting ready to molt.

Some sleepy Adelie penguins basking in the sun at Hut Point, McMurdo Station. They come ashore to escape the seals and whales that might want to eat them. These ones are just getting ready to molt.

Cute Adelie penguins sleeping on Hut Point in McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

Cute Adelie penguins sleeping on Hut Point in McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

Emperor penguins just starting to molt.  During the molting process they will replace their feathers and won't enter the water because they are won't be waterproof and would get cold.  Molting can take up to a month.  They get nice and fat before the molt because they won't be able to eat or catch fish until their new coat of feathers is ready for swimming.

Emperor penguins just starting to molt. During the molting process they will replace their feathers and won’t enter the water because they are won’t be waterproof and would get cold. Molting can take up to a month. They get nice and fat before the molt because they won’t be able to eat or catch fish until their new coat of feathers is ready for swimming.

Emperor penguins that are molting.  You can see they are starting to lose feathers on their backs.  Emperor penguins are very large compared to Adelies and can measure up to about 3 feet tall when standing up straight.  They don't have any land predators so they just hang out and watch you take pictures of them.  Sometimes they will approach you when they are curious.

Emperor penguins that are molting. You can see they are starting to lose feathers on their backs. Emperor penguins are very large compared to Adelies and can measure up to about 3 feet tall when standing up straight. They don’t have any land predators so they just hang out and watch you take pictures of them. Sometimes they will approach you when they are curious.

An Emperor penguin hanging out on the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica.

An Emperor penguin hanging out on the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica.

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Leading trips to “Room with a View”

It takes a lot of people to keep McMurdo Station running.  Everyone’s job is critical in this process, no matter what they do.  Humans are not meant to survive in this place so we need shelter, special clothing, power, drinkable water, reliable transportation, etc.  We rely on each other to keep things working and to stay alive.  A lot of these jobs are not glamorous, yet they are done by really awesome people.  They say McMurdo has more graduate students doing dishes than any place on earth.  Where am I going with this you ask?  Well, most people never get to leave McMurdo in the course of their jobs… in fact some never leave their building!  The NSF and station management have outings or “morale trips” to ensure people get a chance to get out and see something off the station.

One of these trips is via snowmobiles to a place called “Room with a View” which is located on the flank of Mt Erebus.  Since I am the Snowmobile Instructor, I had the pleasure of leading these trips and training the other guides.  This is something I take very seriously as Antarctica can be extremely dangerous and conditions can change in a moments.  Whiteouts can blind you and you can’t even tell which way is up. Crevasses can swallow you.  Temperatures can cause frostbite, hypothermia, and death very quickly if you can’t seek shelter.  Normally we don’t go outside if conditions are really bad, but sometimes weather moves in before you can get back to station.  Because of that we keep “survival bags” with us at all times when off base.  We also have very strict checkout procedures so that a search team can be called upon even if someone misses a check-in by a few minutes.  I’m happy to say that I kept all my students safe all season.

Looking down the Erebus Glacier Tongue in the frozen Ross Sea.  The glacier tongue is where the glacier leaves land and is literally floating in the sea.  The tongue floats out into the Ross Sea about 7+ miles.  A couple years ago a 2 mile section of the tongue broke off and floated away when the annual ice melted.  In the background you can see the Royal Society Mountain Range.  The islands are Tent Island and Razorback from left to right.

Looking down the Erebus Glacier Tongue in the frozen Ross Sea. The glacier tongue is where the glacier leaves land and is literally floating in the sea. The tongue floats out into the Ross Sea about 7+ miles. A couple years ago a 2 mile section of the tongue broke off and floated away when the annual ice melted. In the background you can see the Royal Society Mountain Range. The islands are Tent Island and Razorback from left to right.

This picture is looking down the peninsula with Mt. Discovery in the left background.  The US Antarctic base McMurdo Station, and the New Zealand Scott Base are located at the end of the peninsula.   On the left side of the peninsula is the Ross Ice Shelf, and on the right side is the Ross Sea.  This is one of the most southern areas accessible by ship which is why Robert Falcon Scott chose this location for his Discovery Hut.

This picture is looking down the peninsula with Mt. Discovery in the left background. The US Antarctic base McMurdo Station, and the New Zealand Scott Base are located at the end of the peninsula. On the left side of the peninsula is the Ross Ice Shelf, and on the right side is the Ross Sea. This is one of the most southern areas accessible by ship which is why Robert Falcon Scott chose this location for his Discovery Hut.

Cracks and crevasses in the snow on the side of Mt Erebus.  These cracks are deceiving... they are actually large enough to swallow a house... and who knows how deep.  The are opened up by snow/glaciers moving down Erebus and flowing over the uneven terrain below.

Cracks and crevasses in the snow on the side of Mt Erebus. These cracks are deceiving… they are actually large enough to swallow a house… and who knows how deep. The are opened up by snow/glaciers moving down Erebus and flowing over the uneven terrain below.

More crevasses in the side of Mt. Erebus.  This side of Erebus is very deadly and not safe to travel on.  The safer route up the volcano is on the opposite side.

More crevasses in the side of Mt. Erebus. This side of Erebus is very deadly and not safe to travel on. The safer route up the volcano is on the opposite side.

Looking across the Ross Ice Shelf near Windless Bight.  It's definitely not windless though... The winds can actually blow at hurricane forces out here.  Antarctica is the windiest, coldest, driest, and highest mean elevation continent on Earth.  The snow/ice just keeps going and going and going.  Distances are very deceiving and are actually much further than they appear.   This part of the ice shelf moves up to 400 ft per year.

Looking across the Ross Ice Shelf near Windless Bight. It’s definitely not windless though… The winds can actually blow at hurricane forces out here. Antarctica is the windiest, coldest, driest, and highest mean elevation continent on Earth. The snow/ice just keeps going and going and going. Distances are very deceiving and are actually much further than they appear. This part of the ice shelf moves up to 400 ft per year.

A storm moving in quickly on Room with a View.  When it hit you couldn't see more than a few feet in any direction.

A storm moving in quickly on Room with a View. When it hit you couldn’t see more than a few feet in any direction.

A group cartwheel session on the route to "Room With A View".  I am on the far right in the blue jacket.  This pic was taken on my birthday which is why I'm wearing the Birthday Boy cape!

A group cartwheel session on the route to “Room With A View”. I am on the far right in the blue jacket. This pic was taken on my birthday which is why I’m wearing the Birthday Boy cape!

Me in my birthday cape.  I tried to fly, but it didn't work.

Me in my birthday cape. I tried to fly, but it didn’t work.

Cape Royds – Penguin Rookery and Shackelton’s Hut

A while back I had the opportunity to visit Cape Royds.  This is where Shackleton’s Hut is located.  It was built for the 1907-1909 British Antarctic Expedition led by Shackleton who sailed down on the Nimrod.  Robert Falcon Scott lost a little respect for Shackleton during their Discovery Expedition partly because Shackleton became very ill with scurvy.  Shackleton had asked Scott if he could use the Discovery Hut for his expedition and Scott said no as he was planning on using it for another expedition of his own.  This forced Shackleton to build his own hut at Cape Royds.  During this expedition, Shackleton and his men were the first to make it to the South Magnetic Pole and they were a mere 97 miles from making it to the South Geographic Pole!  They were also the first to climb Mt. Erebus, the Southernmost active volcano in the world.  Erebus rises right out of the Ross Sea to an altitude of 12,448 feet and is covered in dangerous glaciers and deep crevasses.  In addition to Shackleton’s hut, there is an Adelie Penguin rookery at this spot.  During the time I visited, the Adelies had young chicks.  Cape Royds has a lot of volcanic features such as a black sand beach, and ventifacts which are rocks that have been sculpted into cool shapes by thousands of years of wind.

A selfie of me at Cape Royds, Antarctica.  This pic was taken overlooking the Adelie Penguin rookery.  There were up to 4000 penguins here nesting and hatching their young chicks.  In the background is the Ross Sea with the ice breaking up.  The penguins like to hang out on the ice floes and are amazing swimmers.  They are like little torpedos shooting through the water and leaping into the air and landing back on the ice.

A selfie of me at Cape Royds, Antarctica. This pic was taken overlooking the Adelie Penguin rookery. There were up to 4000 penguins here nesting and hatching their young chicks. In the background is the Ross Sea with the ice breaking up. The penguins like to hang out on the ice floes and are amazing swimmers. They are like little torpedos shooting through the water and leaping into the air and landing back on the ice.

This was my ride out to Cape Evans... A Bell 212 helicopter!!  It was so fun!!!  It makes me want to be a pilot.  : )

This was my ride out to Cape Evans… A Bell 212 helicopter!! It was so fun!!! It makes me want to be a pilot. : )

Me inside Shackleton's Cape Royds hut pretending to warm myself over the stove.  The great men that occupied this hut were truly amazing and to experience and feel the history of this place cannot be put into words.  I have read of many of the hardships and have experienced Antarctica personally, but to actually do it they way they did, without modern technology and communications, is mind boggling.  These men were hearty souls who experienced great hardships for little or no glory.  Any of the stories of these men, such as "Shackleton's Forgotten Men" or "Endurance" or the story of RF Scott are well worth the read.

Me inside Shackleton’s Cape Royds hut pretending to warm myself over the stove. The great men that occupied this hut were truly amazing and to experience and feel the history of this place cannot be put into words. I have read of many of the hardships and have experienced Antarctica personally, but to actually do it they way they did, without modern technology and communications, is mind boggling. These men were hearty souls who experienced great hardships for little or no glory. Any of the stories of these men, such as “Shackleton’s Forgotten Men” or “Endurance” or the story of RF Scott are well worth the read.

The inside of Shackleton's Hut at Cape Royds, Antarctica.  This was Shackleton's base during his British Antarctic Expedition of 1907-1909.  Of the three huts I have been to (Scott's Discovery, Scott's Cape Evans, and Shackleton's Cape Royds) this one was the nicest by far.  It' is also the least visited.  I was very lucky and fortunate to be a hut guide and have access to these amazing historical places.  I enjoyed sharing them with others.  This was also the hut where they found Shackleton's lost whiskey which has been duplicated by a modern distiller.  I had some of his whiskey poured atop a chunk of iceberg that was broken off a glacier.  The ice was pure and actually hissed in the glass due to the ice being compressed over thousands of years.

The inside of Shackleton’s Hut at Cape Royds, Antarctica. This was Shackleton’s base during his British Antarctic Expedition of 1907-1909. Of the three huts I have been to (Scott’s Discovery, Scott’s Cape Evans, and Shackleton’s Cape Royds) this one was the nicest by far. It’ is also the least visited. I was very lucky and fortunate to be a hut guide and have access to these amazing historical places. I enjoyed sharing them with others. This was also the hut where they found Shackleton’s lost whiskey which has been duplicated by a modern distiller. I had some of his whiskey poured atop a chunk of iceberg that was broken off a glacier. The ice was pure and actually hissed in the glass due to the ice being compressed over thousands of years.

An Adelie penguin walking towards me at Cape Royds, Antarctica.  There is an Adelie penguin rookery at this spot, and they lay their eggs here.  During the time I was there, the Adelies had young chicks.  They are so cute and curious.

An Adelie penguin walking towards me at Cape Royds, Antarctica. There is an Adelie penguin rookery at this spot, and they lay their eggs here. During the time I was there, the Adelies had young chicks. They are so cute and curious.

I took this picture from a beautiful black sand beach at Cape Royds, Antarctica.  I love the little Adelie penguins and especially this one because of it's movements and the contrast between its black color and the surrounding ice.

I took this picture from a beautiful black sand beach at Cape Royds, Antarctica. I love the little Adelie penguins and especially this one because of it’s movements and the contrast between its black color and the surrounding ice.

The Barne glacier flowing down to the Ross Sea from the side of Mt. Erebus.  The picture is deceiving but believe it or not, this glacier is huge!  The face of it is 100-200 ft high and is massive!  This picture was taken out the window of the helicopter I rode in to Cape Royds.

The Barne glacier flowing down to the Ross Sea from the side of Mt. Erebus. The picture is deceiving but believe it or not, this glacier is huge! The face of it is 100-200 ft high and is massive! This picture was taken out the window of the helicopter I rode in to Cape Royds.

The Ross Sea ice breaking up with the Royal Society range in the background.  The Royal Society mountains are part of the Trans-Antarctic mountain range.  I have painted them more than a few times this season.  I never get sick of looking at them especially as the light and shadows change.  The best was during the mornings of "Winfly" where the alpenglow made them pink and purple.

The Ross Sea ice breaking up with the Royal Society range in the background. The Royal Society mountains are part of the Trans-Antarctic mountain range. I have painted them more than a few times this season. I never get sick of looking at them especially as the light and shadows change. The best was during the mornings of “Winfly” where the alpenglow made them pink and purple.

 

The icebreaker USCGC Polar Star

Recently we had the USCGC Polar Star in and around McMurdo Station, Antarctica.  It is one of the largest icebreakers in the world, and I believe is the largest US icebreaker.  I was told it can break ice up to 18 feet thick!  It came down here to break up the Ross Sea ice so our fuel tanker and cargo ship could bring supplies.  It was delayed slightly because it was sent out to rescue the ships stranded in the ice down here that were making a lot of headlines in the news.  Once it broke out our ice we immediately started seeing a lot of wildlife appear.  Pods of Minke whales, Orca (killer) whales, more seals and penguins, but still no snow yeti’s yet.  Ha ha.  We also started seeing some other ships in the sea near us… one belonged to an Australian billionaire, and other research and adventure cruise ships.  When the icebreaker was done with it’s tasking we had the chance to tour the ship.

The USCGC Polar Star.  One of the largest icebreakers in the world.  USCGC stands for United States Coast Guard Cutter.  Here the ship is docked at the floating ice pier at McMurdo Station, Antarctica.  Hut Point is in the background which is where Scott's Discovery Hut is located.  The week earlier the ship broke out the ice in the Ross Sea and the winds and currents quickly carried it out to sea.  It was amazing how fast it all left.  I was in the birds nest at the top of the ship!!

The USCGC Polar Star. One of the largest icebreakers in the world. USCGC stands for United States Coast Guard Cutter. Here the ship is docked at the floating ice pier at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. Hut Point is in the background which is where Scott’s Discovery Hut is located. The week earlier the ship broke out the ice in the Ross Sea and the winds and currents quickly carried it out to sea. It was amazing how fast it all left. I was in the birds nest at the top of the ship!!

The engineering room of the USCGC Polar Star.  This is where everything is monitored and controlled.

The engineering room of the USCGC Polar Star. This is where everything is monitored and controlled.

This is one of the turbine engines powering the ship.  It's really huge!  I think there were three, along with several diesel/electric engines also.  The picture is from behind a sealed door so it's not very clear.  When the ship is breaking ice, all of the engines are at max power and the whole ship makes lots of really loud noises.  The engineer told me they could break ice up to 18 ft thick.  Don't quote me though.

This is one of the turbine engines powering the ship. It’s really huge! I think there were three, along with several diesel/electric engines also. The picture is from behind a sealed door so it’s not very clear. When the ship is breaking ice, all of the engines are at max power and the whole ship makes lots of really loud noises. The engineer told me they could break ice up to 18 ft thick. Don’t quote me though.

This is the bridge of the ship.  I am at the wheel yelling into the tube for the crew to swab the poop deck.  : )  The special red bat phone there on the dash in front of me rang while I was at the wheel.  It was probably the President calling.  LOL

This is the bridge of the ship. I am at the wheel yelling into the tube for the crew to swab the poop deck. : ) The special red bat phone there on the dash in front of me rang while I was at the wheel. It was probably the President calling. LOL

Me in the bird's nest of the USCGC Polar Star icebreaker.  To get here I had to climb up many ladders in a narrow tube.  I can't imagine what it would have been like to do that while the ship is rolling on the sea.  The top would sway much more than at lower places on the ship.  This tower is used for spotting during ship operations.  Behind me you can see our ice pier floating in the water next to the ship, and Hut Point in the background.  I'm not sure if we were supposed to go up there.  I heard our tour guide may have been in some hot water for letting a few of us climb up there.  It was cool!

Me in the bird’s nest of the USCGC Polar Star icebreaker. To get here I had to climb up many ladders in a narrow tube. I can’t imagine what it would have been like to do that while the ship is rolling on the sea. The top would sway much more than at lower places on the ship. This tower is used for spotting during ship operations. Behind me you can see our ice pier floating in the water next to the ship, and Hut Point in the background. I’m not sure if we were supposed to go up there. I heard our tour guide may have been in some hot water for letting a few of us climb up there. It was cool!

Looking up towards the "bird's nest" from the top deck of the USCGC Polar Star icebreaker.  When I took this picture I was already about 6 stories up off the water or more.

Looking up towards the “bird’s nest” from the top deck of the USCGC Polar Star icebreaker. When I took this picture I was already about 6 stories up off the water or more.

The ship's map of the Ross Sea region where McMurdo Station is located.  I believe the lines drawn are the ship lanes or the route they broke the ice.

The ship’s map of the Ross Sea region where McMurdo Station is located. I believe the lines drawn are the ship lanes or the route they broke the ice.

New photos found in Scott’s Hut!!

Here is some info on the new photos found in Scott’s Hut. It’s amazing to look at as I have seen and been to these places!

The article is published by the Antarctic Heritage Trust who are performing some restoration on the hut.   There are some other great pictures of the historic huts also.  Please check it out.

http://www.nzaht.org/AHT/antarctic-photos/

Cape Evans, Antarctica. Part 2

Howdy again everyone.  It’s been a busy couple weeks as I have been training lots of scientists the art of snowmobiling, selling paintings at the McMurdo craft show, and doing Search & Rescue training.  I have lots of new material to post, just not enough time, so please be patient, but there is lots more exciting things to come. : )

Here is part 2 of my Cape Evans post.  I hope you enjoy the pictures.  It was one of the most incredible days I have had in this amazing place.

Some beautiful ice crystals near Cape Evans, Antarctica.

Some beautiful ice crystals near Cape Evans, Antarctica.

Ice crystal formations near Cape Evans, Antarctica.

Ice crystal formations near Cape Evans, Antarctica.

The Barne Glacier.  This is the end of the glacier where it runs into the Ross Sea.

The Barne Glacier. This is the end of the glacier where it runs into the Ross Sea.

Icebergs frozen into the Ross Sea at Cape Evans, Antarctica.

Icebergs frozen into the Ross Sea at Cape Evans, Antarctica.

The remains of a dog in the stable area of R.F. Scott's Hut at Cape Evans, Antarctica.  The chain and collar are still on the dog.  It looks like it simply laid down to rest on it's bed and died.  : (  The early explorers used dog teams to reach the South Pole and they were often used as food when they became weak.

The remains of a dog in the stable area of R.F. Scott’s Hut at Cape Evans, Antarctica. The chain and collar are still on the dog. It looks like it simply laid down to rest on it’s bed and died. : ( The early explorers used dog teams to reach the South Pole and they were often used as food when they became weak.

A snowshoe made for a horse.  R.F. Scott tried to use horses to reach the South Pole, but they proved to be unsuccessful.  When they could no longer make it though the deep snow, the horses were killed and used for food.

A snowshoe made for a horse. R.F. Scott tried to use horses to reach the South Pole, but they proved to be unsuccessful. When they could no longer make it though the deep snow, the horses were killed and used for food.

A huge stack of seal blubber.  The seal blubber was used to provide both food (which likely sucked) and was burned in "blubber stoves" to heat the historic huts of the early Antarctic explorers.  The blubber still appears to be oozing fats and oil as there is nothing here to cause decomposition.  No insects, rodents, and freezing temps year round.  The smell of the blubber is very distinct and quite noticeable in Scott's hut at Cape Evans, and the Discovery Hut located at Hut Point.

A huge stack of seal blubber. The seal blubber was used to provide both food (which likely sucked) and was burned in “blubber stoves” to heat the historic huts of the early Antarctic explorers. The blubber still appears to be oozing fats and oil as there is nothing here to cause decomposition. No insects, rodents, and freezing temps year round. The smell of the blubber is very distinct and quite noticeable in Scott’s hut at Cape Evans, and the Discovery Hut located at Hut Point.

Tea and other supplies inside of Scott's Hut at Cape Evans, Antarctica.

Tea and other supplies inside of Scott’s Hut at Cape Evans, Antarctica.

The dining table inside Scott's Hut at Cape Evans.  Both Shackleton and Scott's expeditions used this table.  Imagine the holiday celebrations the men had, the discussions, the planning for their attempts to be the first to reach the South Pole.  The history just oozes out of this fantastic place and you can literally feel it.  Amazing!

The dining table inside Scott’s Hut at Cape Evans. Both Shackleton and Scott’s expeditions used this table. Imagine the holiday celebrations the men had, the discussions, the planning for their attempts to be the first to reach the South Pole. The history just oozes out of this fantastic place and you can literally feel it. Amazing!

Medical supplies inside the hut.  Everything is still in place, as if the men would be returning at any time.

Medical supplies inside the hut. Everything is still in place, as if the men would be returning at any time.

A table containing artifacts and science projects of the early Antarctic explorers.  The emperor penguin is not stuffed.  It is just as it was originally left.  History is frozen in time.

A table containing artifacts and science projects of the early Antarctic explorers. The emperor penguin is not stuffed. It is just as it was originally left. History is frozen in time.

Here I am looking like I have bug eyes.  LOL.  In the background you can see an iceberg frozen in the Ross Sea, and Mt Erebus erupting!  Such an awesome day!!

Here I am looking like I have bug eyes. LOL. In the background you can see an iceberg frozen in the Ross Sea, and Mt Erebus erupting! Such an awesome day!!

Icebergs in the Ross Sea Ice and Scott’s Hut at Cape Evans

Here are some pictures of icebergs stuck in Ross Sea ice. They were truly amazing to see and much more impressive than the pictures show. Only about 10% of the iceberg is visible so the other 90% is underwater. These icebergs were likely grounded deep underwater and then frozen in the annual Ross Sea Ice.

The last picture is of R. F. Scott’s hut at Cape Evans, Antarctica. This was built as his home base during his South Pole Expedition over 100 years ago. He and his men died on their return from the pole. They nearly made it to a food depot stashed in the ice.

A large iceberg stuck in the Ross Sea Ice.

A large iceberg stuck in the Ross Sea Ice.

A very large iceberg stuck in the Ross Sea Ice.  A Hagglund is in the distance.

A very large iceberg stuck in the Ross Sea Ice. A Hagglund is in the distance.

I love icebergs!!

I love icebergs!!

Me in front of the iceberg.

Me in front of the iceberg.

This massive iceberg is stuck in the Ross Sea Ice.  It is sticking out of the ice about 50 feet and the other 90% of it is under the sea ice!!  That is an ice cave about half way up the face of it.

This massive iceberg is stuck in the Ross Sea Ice. It is sticking out of the ice about 50 feet and the other 90% of it is under the sea ice!! That is an ice cave about half way up the face of it.

Another shot of the large iceberg.

Another shot of the large iceberg.

Iceberg stuck in the Ross Sea Ice.  A pressure ridge crack around the whole thing makes the perimeter very dangerous.

Iceberg stuck in the Ross Sea Ice. A pressure ridge crack around the whole thing makes the perimeter very dangerous.

Beautiful iceberg in the Ross Sea Ice.  The part showing above the surface is only about 10% of it's actual size.   That would mean that the part we can't see is over 500 feet down under the ice!

Beautiful iceberg in the Ross Sea Ice. The part showing above the surface is only about 10% of it’s actual size. That would mean that the part we can’t see is over 500 feet down under the ice!

The Trans-Antarctic Mountains behind a giant iceberg.  The mountains are also known as the Royal Society range.

The Trans-Antarctic Mountains behind a giant iceberg. The mountains are also known as the Royal Society range.

Looking down a sea ice crack

Looking down a sea ice crack

Scott's Hut at Cape Evans, Antarctica.  This was R.F. Scott's base during his South Pole expedition over 100 years ago.  It's amazing to think that it exists exactly as they left it.

Scott’s Hut at Cape Evans, Antarctica. This was R.F. Scott’s base during his South Pole expedition over 100 years ago. It’s amazing to think that it exists exactly as they left it.